Upcoming at Thinkspace Gallery Kwon Kyung-Yup’s Solo Exhibition “Melancholia”

Juxtapoz Kwon Kyung-Yup

Kwon Kyung-Yup: Melancholia
April 30, 2016 – May 21, 2016

Thinkspace Gallery is pleased to present Melancholia, the gallery’s first solo exhibition of paintings by Korean artist Kwon Kyung-Yup. A graduate of Sejong University in Korea, where she completed an M.F.A, Kwon is currently based out of Seoul. Known for her pale ghostly paintings of delicately rendered figures, the artist uses the human body in her imagery as a vehicle for healing, mourning, and memory. Meditative in their starkness and otherworldly in their filmy delicacy, her figurative depictions are cathartic and emotional, suggesting both trauma and recovery, forgetting and remembering.

Kwon’s figures seem suspended in time, arrested in a sort of ageless androgyny. They are beautiful, and yet unspecific, functioning more like symbolic emblems than individual subjects. When creating her work she describes a process of emotive recall in which she revisits emotional events from her past, actively summoning memories to inspire the work. The figure becomes a literal instrument of psycho-spiritual expression through which she explores universally relatable, though intensely personal, themes of femininity, sexuality, death, libidinal impulse, transformation, and ego. The human body becomes a poetic device through which Kwon explores existential drives and deficiencies.

The artist describes her paintings as meditative spaces in which she depicts longing, sadness, and fantasy. A deliberate slowness and calm are typical of their tone and pace. A single figure, minimally adorned, tends to occupy the focus of the foreground. Surrounded by a still expanse of emptiness, there are few other details, if any, to distract from the complete presence of the form. The viewer is left feeling captivated, drawn in by the concise simplicity of the image, submerged in its heavy quietude. The figures’ skins convey a nuanced depth and pallor, an impressive range of gradation and muted color that resonates through several thin, carefully applied, layers of oil paint. Kwon’s attention to the translucent rendering of these milky skins, and the contrast she creates with subtly bloodshot eyes and carefully stylized features transports the figurative realism in her work beyond the realm of naturalism. The figures are excessively human in their pristine vulnerability, and yet entirely other, emotionally charged, and surreal.

At times, the bodies depicted in Kwon’s works are wrapped in bandages, caught somewhere between life, trauma, death, and convalescence. This space of ambiguity in which the self is suspended somewhere between a beginning and an end is a recurrent theme in her work. Measured and introspective, Kwon’s process is thoughtful rather than reactive, and each piece takes up to two months to complete. She begins her paintings in a contemplative state, a literal meditation aided by conscious breath work, and carefully allows the surface to live, extracting wraiths from the void.

kwon kyung-yup melancholia

Thinkspace Family on Instagram: 4

On Instagram, you will always find us posting sneak peeks, studio shots, and the work of our Thinkspace family from around the world. Follow the accounts of those artists and you’ll get a sneak peak into their lives and creative process. To continue our series, Thinkspace Family on Instagram, here are the accounts of our current exhibiting artist, Amy Sol and KIKYZ1313, along with the work of other inspired whimsical detailed artists.  The Instagram accounts below are in the following order; Amy Sol, Kelly Vivanco, Alison Sommers, KIKYZ1313, Ozabu.

The last day to view Amy Sol’s “Garden Gamine” and KIKYZ1313’s “Progeny of Chaos” is this Saturday, April 23rd. Catch up on the inspiration behind the exhibitions in our interview with Amy Sol and KIKYZ1313 and visit the gallery during our hours from noon to 6pm, today through Saturday.

all nighting 🌙🎨 #oilpaint #wip

A photo posted by Amy Sol (@amysol) on

Slowly🐌#kellyvivanco #tendrils

A photo posted by Kelly Vivanco (@verpabunny) on

Somehow, this manages to constitute hours’ work. #gouache #greyday

A photo posted by Atelierbetriebe A. W. Sommers (@allisonsommers) on

wip for my solo show in Sep at @thinkspace_art

A photo posted by おざぶ (@ozabu) on

Amy Sol’s ‘Miora’s Cup’ Print Available Online This Friday.

amy sol print

We will be releasing Amy Sol’s ‘Miora’s Cup’ print online, this Friday at 10:00 am PST. You can purchase the print on our website at thinkspacegallery.com/shop and view the original piece now at Thinkspace Gallery.

Amy Sol
‘Miora’s Cup’
18×24 inches
Edition of 40
Signed and numbered by the artist
Giclee print on 300gsm stock
$150 each

amy sol drawing

Amy Sol’s “Garden Garmine” Featured on Hi-Fructose.com

HiFructose Amy Sol

Hi-Fructose features Amy Sol’s exhibition”Garden Gamine” discussing her creative process and the organic inspiration behind the work.

Visit Hi-Fructose’s website for the full feature.

“Experimenting with mediums is the phase I am in right now”, says Sol, who just started using oil paint a year ago. “It is a huge challenge for me, and I feel it’s good because there are so many possibilities to be explored. My biggest rule is to trust my instinct.” – Amy Sol

Amy Sol’s “Garden Gamine” & KIKYZ1313’s “The Progeny of Chaos” Opening Reception Recap

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier

Last weekend Amy Sol’s “Garden Gamine” and KIKYZ1313 “The Progeny of Chaos” opened to a great reception with a modest line forming before doors. KIKYZ1313 set the mood for her exhibition in the project room with pink walls and an ambient noise track looping throughout the night. A number of pieces from Amy Sol sold throughout the night with only a few pieces still available. Both exhibitions are on view through April 23rd, the details in both artists work must be seen in person.

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception photo by Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 opening reception - Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Bryan “Birdman” Mier

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

amy sol and kikyz1314 Opening Reception Photo Courtesy of Sam Graham

 

View all the pieces from both exhibitions on our website.

All photos are courtesy of Bryan”Birdman”Mier and Sam Graham. 

Creative Process, Works In Progress : Amy Sol & KIKYZ1313

Amy Sol’s “Garden Gamine” exhibition in the Thinkspace Gallery main room and KIKYZ1313’s “Progeny of Chaos” debut exhibition with us in the project room, opens only a few days from now. The pieces are being arranged and hung, but the process from panel to our white walls isn’t a fast one.

Below are insights into the artists’ creative processes and teasers of the works in progress shared on Instagram. Please join us this Saturday, April 2nd for the opening reception of both exhibitions from 6-9pm.

Read our full interview with Amy Sol here

glaze on glaze off 🙆🙇 #oilpainting

A video posted by Amy Sol (@amysol) on

Amy, walk us through what a day in the studio looks like?

When I’m prepping a body of work I tend to, for better or worse, compartmentalize my life to an extreme. I have to do this in order to have the energy and time to create. My life bar is not very strong, so I have to use it wisely. That involves having to isolate myself a bit… so less internet, e-mails and interaction in general. If I’m lucky, it is just me in a room, with plants, my dog, coffee, lots of decent listening material, and a block of time to paint and do nothing else.

#🎨life 🐢🐢🐢 A photo posted by Amy Sol (@amysol) on

It takes time to for an artist to develop their voice and style, then once they have defined who they are as an artist they must continue to push and grow without losing their voice. Amy, as you’ve been in the post-contemporary world for nearly 10 years now, how do you push yourself to grow and experiment while still maintaining your unique style?

Experimenting with mediums is the phase I am in right now, I just started using oil a year ago. It is a huge challenge for me, and I feel it’s good because there are so many possibilities to be explored. My biggest rule is to trust my instincts. If I get a new idea, I try it out. I can’t put much energy into thinking where it will all lead to and how it might change me. I just try it, and if it doesn’t work I can paint over it. If I am excited to paint and getting something out of it, I feel I’m on the right path. Being in that mindset isn’t always as easy as it sounds but it’s what I aim for.

Read our full interview with KIKYZ1313 here.  

  This one is slowly coming to life 🌼🌿(showing one of the boring parts only) #theprogenyofchaos #thinkspacegallery   A photo posted by Kikyz1313 (@kikyz1313) on

KIKYZ1313, walk us through what a day in the studio looks like?

The studio is next to the bedroom, so as soon as I wake up , about 9:00 in the morning I like to go and check whatever I did last day in case my eyes were too tired and see if I messed it up in some way, relieved or worried I take a breakfast and start working in the drawing till 13:00 hrs approximately to do some grocery shopping for the day’s meal and go back home to cook. I like to take a little 20 or 30 min of rest and then I continue where I left the drawing. Around 19:00 hrs I take another half hour of spare time, play with the cat, social media, e-mails, etc. and go back to the drawing table for another couple more hours and finish the day with a nice cup of tea and movies. I usually do between 8 to 9 hours drawing, but when I’m in a rush for something I can even spend 12 hours drawing a day, and still it is hard for me to keep up with most of the artist out there, but really hope the effort stands out from every drawing.

 

Interview with Amy Sol for upcoming exhibition “Garden Gamine”

Amy Sol Interview Banner

Thinkspace Gallery is proud to present Amy Sol’s latest body of work with her solo exhibition “Garden Gamine.” In anticipation of the show we have an exclusive interview with Amy Sol sharing with us her inspiration, love of nature, and creative process.

Do your characters possess a complete narrative or are they suspended in the moment we see?
There is rarely a narrative in place when I start a new painting. It’s more fun to build a story or setting around the first spark of idea. But I’d say it’s closer to being a suspended moment. Often, I like to capture something mid-moment, where you can imagine a before and after. I really try more to hone in on a feeling, but loosely enough to be interpreted.

Walk us through what a day in the studio looks like?
When I’m prepping a body of work I tend to, for better or worse, compartmentalize my life to an extreme. I have to do this in order to have the energy and time to create. My life bar is not very strong, so I have to use it wisely. That involves having to isolate myself a bit… so less internet, e-mails and interaction in general. If I’m lucky, it is just me in a room, with plants, my dog, coffee, lots of decent listening material, and a block of time to paint and do nothing else.

Amy Sol Garden Gamine

What was playing in the background while you were working on this exhibition?
Everything. I consume tons of music, audiobooks etc. I’ve been more into podcasts lately. Especially if it’s focused on science, nature, or personal story telling. I just found an art podcast called Artist Decoded— the episode with Phil Hale is so good, I listened to it twice. I’ve had to paint thru headaches at times and oddly found asmr tapping videos to help. They got kind of addicting, so now if I’m feeling wound up I’ll actually listen to that stuff with headphones for hours sometimes.

What do you feel is the biggest misconception about being an artist?
mmm, I guess that it’s easy and all fun and no sacrifices need to be made if you choose to do it for a living. but no one actually thinks that… right? ;-P

It takes time to for an artist to develop their voice and style, then once they have defined who they are as an artist they must continue to push and grow without losing their voice. Having been in the post-contemporary world for nearly 10 years now, how do you push yourself to grow and experiment while still maintaining your unique style?
Experimenting with mediums is the phase I am in right now, I just started using oil a year ago. It is a huge challenge for me, and I feel it’s good because there are so many possibilities to be explored. My biggest rule is to trust my instinct, if I get a new idea, I try it out. I can’t put much energy into thinking where it will all lead to and how it might change me. I just try it, and if it doesn’t work I can paint over it. If I am excited to paint and getting something out of it, I feel I’m on the right path. Being in that mindset isn’t always as easy as it sounds but it’s what I aim for.

Amy Sol Garden Gamine 2

What’s your spirit animal?
A miniature panda! It reminds me to eat veggies and not take myself too seriously.

You use a lot of organic elements and imagery in your work, do you have a favorite garden or park you like to retreat to?
If I am ever visiting a city, I always check out the gardens or nature spaces. I love looking at plants. Even if there is one tree outside my window, it’s good enough. Looking at plants is really important to my well-being. I don’t know the mechanism behind this, but it works. A simple shape of a leaf or lines of a branch can communicate so much within a painting, it’s a big part of my visual language.

Amy Sol Garden Gamine 3

You’ve stated the Ghibli studio is a major inspiration, have you seen the documentary “The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness”?
Yes, I really love that documentary! It’s beautiful. Animation was a huge early influence towards the look and feel of my work now. Classic disney films played a big role in that too. As a kid I would pause the VHS tapes of Sleeping Beauty and Bambi and try to draw the forest backgrounds.

If you could live in a Miyazaki film for a day, which one would it be?
That’s a tuff one to choose, but I’d have to say Castle in the Sky and it would have to be on Laputa of course.

Amy Sol 4

The opening reception for Amy Sol’s “Garden Garmine” is this Saturday, April 2nd. For more information on the exhibition please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.