Opening Reception of Entry Point: Exploring The New Contemporary Movement at the Fullerton Museum

Fullerton Museum

We invite you out to the opening reception of Entry Point: Exploring The New Contemporary Movement at the Fullerton Museum of Art, Saturday, May 21st from 6 – 9pm. Admission is $12 and free to museum members.

*Reception in tandem with opening of “The Late Drawings of Andy Warhol”

Taking Place At:
Fullerton Museum Center
310 N. Pomona Avenue
Fullerton, CA 92832
Phone 714.738.6545

Curated by Thinkspace Gallery and on view through July 15th.

Cryptik FullertonCryptik ‘E Ho Mai (Grant Us)’ – acrylic on wood panel

‘Entry Point’ brings together the work of 40 internationally renowned artists that serves as an amazing introduction to the burgeoning New Contemporary Art Movement. With roots firmly planted in illustration, pop culture, comics, street art and graffiti, put quite simply the New Contemporary Art Movement is art for the people.

Alex Garant 'Fragments Of Her Mind' - oil on canvasAlex Garant ‘Fragments Of Her Mind’ – oil on canvas

Featuring 16×20 inch (40x50cm) works from:
Aaron Li-Hill
Adam Caldwell
Alex Garant
Amanda Marie
Ben Frost
Benjamin Garcia
Bumblebeelovesyou
C215
Carl Cashman
Chie Yoshii
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Cryptik
Derek Gores
Drew Leshko
Ekundayo
Erik Siador
Frank Gonzales
Gaia
Henrik Aa. Uldalen
Hueman
Jaime Molina (aka Cuttyup)
Jeremy Hush
Jim Houser
Kari-Lise Alexander
Kelly Vivanco
KiSung Koh
Low Bros
Meggs
Mary Iverson
Nevercrew
Nosego
Okuda
Ratur
Reka
Ricky Lee Gordon
Sarah Joncas
Sckaro
Stinkfish
Tony Philippou
Yok & Sheryo
Nosego 'Infinite' - acrylic on wood panel
Nosego ‘Infinite’ – acrylic on wood panel

Interview with James Bullough for “Breaking Point”

James Bullough Interview

Thinkspace Gallery is proud to present James Bullough’s solo exhibition Breaking Point, in the gallery’s project room. In anticipation for the show, we have an exclusive interview with James Bullough sharing with us his process of moving through creative blocks, moving to Berlin, and a dream dinner party.

SH: Artists explore many different styles before finding their voice, what inspired you to explore altered reality and what about it clicked as this was your voice?
JB: When I first started painting back in my early 20s and for probably the first 5 years or so I was painting entirely abstract works with no real direction or voice. These early paintings in retrospect were basically just studies and experimentations in composition and graphic layout. I soon realized that none of them ever felt like finished paintings and they were all missing a vital element. With some guidance from a local painter in Baltimore Matt Zoll, I basically taught myself how to use oils so I could add some elements of realism into my abstract paintings. Almost immediately I realized that the realism was the star of the show and became the main focus of the work but the abstraction never left. as my oil skills increased, I began concentrating on portraiture and that’s when it all started clicking for me. The mixture of realism and abstraction has been my thing ever since.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What does a day in the studio look like, from morning to night?
JB: My work day is very different depending what stage of the process I’m in. Some days are spent with models and photographers doing photo shoots, others spent on the computer day after day manipulating photos and sketching out potential paintings. In the summers, I spend a lot of time outside painting walls, but in the studio with a brush in hand is where I like to focus most of my attention.

A typical studio day starts with a strong coffee and an hour or so at home on the computer getting any administrative stuff out of the way. I don’t have the internet at my studio which really helps with focus and attention; so once I get to the studio around noon it’s all business from then on. I’m a very slow painter and some days I might only paint a few square inches in an entire 8 hour work day… the hair, a face, a leg, exc.. It can be frustrating but it’s the only way I know how. I normally paint my backgrounds first and then sketch out my figures on top of that. Once the sketch is set in place, I do a quick and somewhat loose underpainting that normally takes a couple days. From there I meticulously paint the final image on top of the underpainting. For the most part, once I’ve put the second layer on any given spot, that section is finished and I move on to the next section. At 8 o’clock I go home and cook with my wife, have a late dinner and then up early the next morning to do it all over again.

SH: You really explore the human form in your work with your models showing extensions or collapse of form, do you take reference photos yourself or find the form elsewhere? Are your models’ dancers?
JB: With this current body of work I had a very clear idea for about a year that I wanted to create an entire series of figures floating in the air. I’ve worked with a few dancers in Berlin before on different projects and through them I met a few more and everyone was super keen to come work on the project with me so I assembled a team. I found a photographer in Hamburg named Florian Gobetz (www.graphic-to-go.de) who had done a series of photos with dancers jumping in the air and asked him to come to Berlin to work with me on the project. I am horrible with a camera but good with directing, so together with Flo’s photography skills and the incredible dancers who gave everything they had to get me the images I wanted we were able to get some amazing photos.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: How do you battle self-doubt or creative blocks?
JB: This is a great question and one of the most difficult parts of being an artist, especially one that works alone. It is not uncommon for me to go weeks in the studio without anyone seeing anything I’ve done. This can be jarring and the self-doubt can really start to fester. I normally get to a point with almost every painting where all I can see are the problems and mistakes, a point where another artist might move on to a different piece and come back later with fresh eyes after some time has passed. I on the other hand approach painting more like sport and each new piece as a battle, once I’ve started, there’s no turning back. Through years of painting this way I’ve learned that if I just plow through, eventually I’ll figure it out.

SH: What made you decide to move to Berlin? How do you think that has shaped you as an artist?
JB: In 2001 I was living in Australia and met a girl from Berlin (now my wife). In the five years that followed my visit to Berlin often to see her and it didn’t take long for me to fall in love with the city. It’s always been hard for me to put my finger on exactly what it was that I fell in love with but there is a sense of freedom and creativity in Berlin that I had never experienced anywhere else. At that time in my life, I needed a change and I knew that Berlin, because of it’s cheap living and creative vibe could provide me with what I needed to make the leap from being a gainfully employed middle school teacher to a basically unemployed full-time painter… and I was right.

In Berlin, I was able to live cheaply and get a studio and just experiment without the pressure of making money and getting a “real job” At the time I still hadn’t found my voice as a painter and I needed a couple of years of trying different things in order to find it. I spent a lot of time in the studio figuring things out and I began painting in the many abandoned spaces in and around Berlin and experimenting with painting on walls for the first time. Those first two or three years in Berlin were extremely important for me and In the end, I think the greatest gift Berlin ever gave to me was time.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What’s been a WOW moment for you thus far in your career?
JB: In 2015 I was invited to paint a wall inside the Long Beach Museum of Art in California as part of the Vitality and Verve show put on by the LBMA, Thinkspace Gallery, and POW! WOW! Long Beach. The other participating artists were some of my biggest influences in the art world and people I had been admiring for years and years… legends like Craola, Audry Kawasaki, Tristan Eaton, Nychos, Jeff Soto and basically everyone involved. I felt like it was a mistake that I was even invited, that I didn’t belong in such a group, but I also saw it as an opportunity to show people what I could really do. I made it my mission to paint my best mural to that point and really go for broke. As I worked there throughout the week and built friendships with these people who meant so much to me, I also banged out a great painting that I was really proud of. There is no greater accomplishment in my opinion than gaining the respect of the people you so greatly admire, and that week I felt like I had done exactly that.

SH: What motivated you to do a podcast? What’s been your most favorite and least favorites part of that process?
JB: VantagePoint Radio was an idea I had after living in Berlin for a few years and meeting so many different and interesting artists. I found myself time and time again sitting in a bar or at a party with someone and because of my curious and chatty nature we often fell into deep conversations about their practices and how and why they do what they do. I found it really inspirational and informative. It just seemed logical that other people would be interested to hear these conversations so I set out to start a radio show. A friend of mine named Tom Phillipson (www.Auto64.com) had worked in radio before in Australia so I asked him to be my co-host and produce the show and it was that simple. Because Berlin is such a magnet for street artists and muralists, we were able to get some of the biggest names in the game and once the ball started rolling it never really stopped. I’m supra proud of what we’ve accomplished with VantagePoint. At this point, we’ve done over 60 interviews and thoroughly documented the scene in a way nobody else has done.

Visit www.VantagePointRadio.com to check out all of the past shows and videos.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: Where was your first mural? What was the prep and execution like?
JB: Oh man… my first mural was in Washington DC on the side of a bar back in 2004 or so. I painted it together with an artist named Andrea Wlodarczyk and we really didn’t know what we were doing. It was a super fun process but took us almost the entire summer, mostly because we painted during open hours and the drinks and food were free so we really didn’t try to rush things. Today I think I’d probably do that wall in an afternoon. It was kind of a cheesy beach scene with a crashing wave and all that but it wasn’t too bad. This was years before I would ever pick up a spray can so we did the whole thing with brushes and latex paint and it was kind of a nightmare. I recently passed by that wall for the first time in years and it’s still there and in pretty good condition. It wasn’t my best work, but I’m still proud of that wall

SH: If you through a dinner party for 5 people dead or alive, who would be on the guest list? What would be served? And what music is playing in the background?
JB: WOW! this is basically an impossible question but here goes…
Guest List: Moss Def, Adam Carolla, Conor Harrington, Erika Badu, and the 25-year-old version of my baby girl who will be born in September
Food: Maryland Blue crabs with tons of Old Bay seasoning and unlimited Natty Boh beer in a can on ice.
Music: The entire album ‘Circles’ by Adam F and a selection of Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Bob James.

James Bullough Breaking Point

SH: What do you think is the biggest misconception about being an artist and about your work in general?
JB: The work ethic! I think people have an impression of artists as relaxed maybe even somewhat lazy creatives. The fact is almost every successful artists I know is an extreme workaholic and a master of the hustle. Learning to paint and create an image from absolutely nothing is a skill and takes a lot of hard work, time, and focus, but the business side of the job is just as demanding. I don’t have an assistant or a manager or anything so every aspect of my business is done by me. Deciding what projects to take and which to turn down, who to work with or not, and knowing how many different projects you can handle at any given time is extremely important and can have massive consequences on your career now and in the future. I don’t think artists get enough credit for what they truly are, extremely driven, self-employed entrepreneurs who both produce and manage the product that their company and family live off of.

James Bullough Postcard

Please join us Saturday, May 28th for the opening reception of Breaking Point from 6-9pm. For additional information on Thinkspace Gallery and our upcoming exhibitions please visit the Thinkspace Gallery website.

Long Beach Museum of Art to Open New Exhibition Vitality and Verve: In the Third Dimension

Vitality and Verve Long Beach Museum of Art

Long Beach Museum of Art to open new exhibition Vitality and Verve: In the Third Dimension on July 15th; an exhibition to feature immersive, multi-media installations by a select group of nationally and internationally renowned urban contemporary artists, ceramic artists, and sculptors.

The Long Beach Museum of Art presents Vitality & Verve: In the Third Dimension, a sequel to last year’s record-breaking exhibition Vitality & Verve: Transforming the Urban Landscape, which saw over 22,000 visitors to the Museum last summer.

Presented in collaboration with POW! WOW! Long Beach and Los Angeles’ Thinkspace gallery, Vitality & Verve: In the Third Dimension showcases works by some of the world’s best street artists, muralists, and new contemporary artists placing an emphasis on their unique sculptural and installation practices. Highlighting this steadily expanding young art movement within a mainstream, museological context, the exhibition celebrates its momentum and cultural presence. The new contemporary movement may have begun in the public and urban domains, but now steadily continues to assert its significance within museum walls. Historically urban public art, in general,  has had to create contexts for the reception and support of its work in the community. It has never been fixed to a singular genre but rather has prospered with fluidity and expanded into all manner of techniques, expressions, media, and spaces. This exhibition captures a historical moment of transition in the global trajectory and increasing diversity of new contemporary art.

Each artist interpreted the Museum space with site-specific installations, murals, and sculptural vignettes, collectively transforming all 8,000 square feet of the venue in an environmental immersive  experience. Participating artists include Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker, Susan Beiner, Rebekah Bogard, Bumblebeelovesyou, Isaac Cordal, Patsy Cox, Ariel DeAndrea, Aaron De La Cruz, Sergio Garcia, Glazed Paradise (Mark Jenkins & Sandra Fernandez), Andrew Hem, Kiel Johnson, Sarah Joncas, Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One), Drew Leshko, Aaron Li-Hill, Troy Lovegates (aka Other), Telmo Miel, Jaime Molina, Brendan Monroe, Luke O’Sullivan, Felipe Pantone, Erika Sanada, Slinkachu, Mark Dean Veca, Cinta Vidal, Hilary White, Yoskay Yamamoto, Alex Yanesw, and Ernest Zacharevic with Martha Cooper.

Vitality & Verve: In the Third Dimension captures the diversity, breadth, and complexity of an art movement no longer confined to subcultural recesses, singular applications of media, or even two dimensions. The artists are working across an impressive array of materials including fiber, wood, plastics, acrylics, resins, cardboard, textiles, paint, ceramics, cement, paper, and reclaimed industrial materials. Activating the spaces of the Museum with murals, site-specific installations, sculptures and immersive environments, the collaborative energy of the complete transformation highlights the heterogeneity of its participants.

By elevating the social and experiential above the formal and academic, these works speak with an immediacy that connects disparate worlds and spaces. Technically accomplished, and undeniably manifold, the artists in this exhibition combine a variety of styles and aesthetic influences to transform and occupy the interior and exterior spaces of the Museum in unique ways. Perhaps most unified by its lack of stylistic exclusion, Vitality & Verve: in the Third Dimension captures the new contemporary art’s tireless energy and profusion, showcasing its continual tendency to change, morph, develop and defy all confines.

“The Long Beach Museum of Art has a long history of presenting contemporary art in all media and we are thrilled to be showing the exciting work from some of the leading artists from around the world. We celebrate the exhibition with a Members Reception and our popular LBMA AfterDark event on Friday evening July 15th.” – Ron Nelson, Executive Director LBMA

V&V3D will be one of several locations in Long Beach this summer that will feature art for the public. POW! WOW! Long Beach 2016 will return with mural projects, gallery shows, and exciting programming throughout downtown and nearby locations.

For membership information and ticket information please contact Matt Harms at math@lbma.org. For more information hours and location please visit the Museum’s website at www.lbma.org

The presentation of Vitality & Verve: In The Third Dimension is made possible by the generous support of The Port of Long Beach, JetBlue, Pasadena Art Alliance, the Bauer Foundation, and Thinkspace Gallery.

The Long Beach Museum of Art presents:
‘Vitality & Verve: In The Third Dimension’

LBMA AfterDark Opening Celebration: Friday, July 15th

Murals and site-specific installations from:
Aaron De La Cruz
Aaron Li-Hill
Andrew Hem
Ariel DeAndrea
Brendan Monroe
Cinta Vidal
Craig ‘Skibs’ Barker
Ernest Zacharevic with Martha Cooper
Felipe Pantone
Glazed Paradise (Mark Jenkins & Sandra Fernandez)
Jaime Molina
Kiel Johnson
Mark Dean Veca
Rebekah Bogard
Sarah Joncas
Telmo Miel
Yoskay Yamamoto

Alongside works from:
Alex Yanes
Bumblebeelovesyou
Drew Leshko
Erika Sanada
Hilary White
Isaac Cordal
Jean Labourdette (aka Turf One)
Luke O’Sullivan
Patsy Cox
Sergio Garcia
Slinkachu
Susan Beiner
Troy Lovegates (aka Other)

About the Long Beach Museum of Art : Located on a magnificent bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the Long Beach Museum of Art features  a historic mansion and carriage house, expansive galleries and gardens, oceanfront dining at Claire’s at the Museum and a unique Museum Store. The galleries and store are open Thursday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday – Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for students and seniors age 62 and older, free for Members and children under 12, and free for everyone on Thursday evening from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. and all day on Friday. Claire’s is open Thursday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, call (562) 439-2119 or visit www.lbma.org.

New Low Bros Print Now Available

Low Bros Print

We’ve dropped a new Low Bros print on thinkspaceprints.com. An edition of 50, this 16″ x 20″ giclee print is hand signed and numbered by Low Bros. There are still a few prints available on the website, so Low Bros’ fans take note!

Also, we have to give a shout out to their latest mural takeover in Lisbon, Portugal – take a look below.

Low Bros Murals in Portugal

Low Bros Portugal

Low Bros Murals in Portugal

Low Bros Murals in Portugal

 

 

‘I AM YOU | YOU ARE ME’ by Ricky Lee Gordon in Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

New to the Thinkspace Family, artist Ricky Lee Gordon completed a stunning mural titled “I Am You | You Are Me” in Chicago for Columbia College Chicago’s Wabash Arts Corridor in conjunction with the WAC Big Walls Festival 2016. Look forward to more work from Ricky Lee Gordon in the coming months as we work his voice into upcoming group exhibitions and shows.

“This piece like most of my work deals with nonduality and interconnectedness.” – Ricky Lee Gordon

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Ricky Lee Gordon Mural Chicago

Matthew Grabelsky Interview on PROHBTD

PROHBTD Grabelsky

Culture website PROHBTD interviewed artist Matthew Grabelsky to discuss his current exhibition “Underground” now on view in the Thinkspace Gallery project room. Please visit PROHBTD’s  website to read Grabelsky’s full interview.

Your characters are placed in everyday situations like riding the subway. Do the characters simply add surrealism, or do any of them reflect animal-like passengers you encountered on the subway?

My central concept is that everyone has a hidden aspect of their mind that can be revealed with an animal hybridization. However, there are certainly many times when I’ve been on the subway and have seen people who are practically fantastical creatures in their own right.  For anyone who has spent time on the subway in New York, the animal characters in my paintings are not that much of a jump from what you see there every day.

Don’t forget to check out our own interview with Matthew Grabelsky!

Branded Arts Presents : RFK MURAL FESITVAL

RFK Mural Festival

GRAND RECEPTION
Friday, May 27, 5PM – 11 PM

Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools
701 S. Catalina St. Los Angeles, CA 90005

SHOW RUNS
May 23 ­ May 27, 2016

In collaboration with LAUSD & Thinkspace Gallery

­ Branded Arts is excited to announce its latest project, the Robert F. Kennedy Mural Festival. 28 artists have been commissioned to paint a series of murals throughout the Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools during a one­-week span from May 23­-27, 2016.

In a desire to promote arts in school, these projects also aim to send an inspirational and positive message to kids ranging from kindergarten to the 12th grade. Not only will murals be painted throughout the week, but the Paul Schrade Library will be transformed into a gallery exhibition space featuring work from over 30 artists, as well as artwork from the students. This project was born out of a collaboration with LAUSD local district central staff under the guidance of superintendent Robert Antonio Martinez.

Built on the site of the former Ambassador Hotel, RFK Community Schools honors its historical significance as the site of not only six autonomous pilot schools, but also as the site of the 1968 assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. To honor the US Senator and his legacy, the school adopted his namesake and commissioned two Judith Baca murals in addition to preserving the original architecture of the Cocoanut Grove Theater. The school was built as a modern interpretation of the original Ambassador Hotel, maintaining elements of the original structure and celebrating its star­studded yet somber history. Local history, art, and education have come together to create a space of diversity, creativity, innovation, and social justice ­ all social elements that RFK Community Schools seeks to foster.

The RFK Mural festival continues to facilitate the importance of art in educational systems, hosting student and public engagement projects throughout its week­long run. Students will be involved with mural production through workshops and seminars hosted by participating artists, and exhibit their artwork alongside the likes of Tim Biskup, D*Face and Erik Jones in the Paul Schrade Library Gallery. There will be opportunities to attend lecture and panel discussions, film screenings, and guided tours of the newly created on­site murals including a 40­foot high portrait of Robert F. Kennedy by Shepard Fairey.

Murals by:
Shepard Fairey, Kenny Scharf, Jeff Soto, Sam Flores, Hueman, David Flores, Greg Mike, Curiot, Mad Steez, Cyrcle, Andrew Hem, Risk, Yoskay Yamamoto, James Bullough, Beau Stanton, Hebru Brantley, Hush, Charlie Edmiston, Colette Miller, Rob Hill, Dallas Clayton, Clinton Bopp, James Haunt, Jonas Never, Josh Everhorn, Baker’s Son, Jose Maradiaga­Andrade, Paige Smith, UR New York

Artwork by:
Ranj, D*Face, Tim Biskup, Zes, Eine, Erik Jones, Adam Caldwell, C215, Carl Cashman, Christine Wu, Craig “Skibs” Barker, Derek Gores, Drew Young, Ekundayo, Joram Roukes, Ken Flewellyn, Low Bros, Meggs, Nosego, Yosuke Ueno, John Park, Shanna Yates, Adam Builds, Brittany Sega, Hans Walor, Drew Merritt, Tracy Tubera, Ease One, Matt Dimon, Bridget Weiser, Tina Chavez, Rachel Harris, Quam Odunsi, Anthony Williams, Carlos Chavez, Ross Morrison, Elle Dyner, Norm Maxwell, Quentin Thomas, Cary Miller, Cameron Helm, Birdman, Tamara Arroba, Darcy Yates, Luis Valle, Jennifer Korsen, Brett Hammond, Conway Bongo, Jaime Becker, Molly Gruninger, Seanny McCarthy, Jay Damon, Billy Morrison, UR New York and the students of Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools

About Branded Arts
Branded Arts is a Los Angeles based organization that offers a full spectrum of artistic services for communities and corporate settings alike. Over the last 5 years they have produced over 150 public and private mural projects around the world, most recently at The Reserve LA, a 20­acre creative campus in Playa Vista, California.

About RFK Community Schools
RFK Community Schools is comprised of six autonomous Pilot schools offering a Kinder through 12th­grade campus on the site of the former Ambassador Hotel, the site of the 1968 assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy. The school was built to relieve underperforming and overcrowded schools located in Pico Union and Koreatown, and now serves over 4000 students from schools that include the Ambassador School of Global Education, Ambassador School of Global Leadership, NOW Academy, UCLACS, School for the Visual Arts and Humanities, and Los Angeles High School of the Arts.

RFK Mural Festival